Creativity and Innovation

Marketing Agency Los Angeles

rainbow_web_0710.jpgThink Creatively
  • Use a wide range of idea creation techniques (such as brainstorming)
  • Create new and worthwhile ideas (both incremental and radical concepts)
  • Elaborate, refine, analyze and evaluate their own ideas in order to improve and maximize creative efforts
Work Creatively with Others
  • Develop, implement and communicate new ideas to others effectively
  • Be open and responsive to new and diverse perspectives; incorporate group input and feedback into the work
  • Demonstrate originality and inventiveness in work and understand the real world limits to adopting new ideas
  • View failure as an opportunity to learn; understand that creativity and innovation is a long-term, cyclical process of small successes and frequent mistakes
Implement Innovations
  • Act on creative ideas to make a tangible and useful contribution to the field in which the innovation will occur


Use this creativity rubric to assess your students.

Use these documents to use teaching strategies to help students develop creative skills.



Creativity Expert

Sir Ken Robinson
Sir Ken Robinson, PhD is an internationally recognized leader in the development of creativity, innovation and human resources. He has worked with governments in Europe, Asia and the USA, with international agencies, Fortune 500 companies, and some of the world’s leading cultural organizations. In 1998, he led a national commission on creativity, education and the economy for the UK Government. ‘All Our Futures: Creativity, Culture and Education’ (The Robinson Report) was published to wide acclaim in 1999. He was the central figure in developing a strategy for creative and economic development as part of the Peace Process in Northern Ireland, working with the ministers for training, education enterprise and culture. He was one of four international advisors to the Singapore Government for its strategy to become the creative hub of South East Asia.



From Educapes

Creative Thinking

Creative thinking involves creating something new or original. It involves the skills of flexibility, originality, fluency, elaboration, brainstorming, modification, imagery, associative thinking, attribute listing, metaphorical thinking, forced relationships. The aim of creative thinking is to stimulate curiosity and promote divergence.

Read the article Teaching Thinking Skills and Critical and Creative Thinking for additional background information.

While critical thinking can be thought of as more left-brain and creative thinking more right brain, they both involve "thinking." When we talk about HOTS "higher-order thinking skills" we're concentrating on the top three levels of Bloom's Taxonomy: analysis, synthesis, and evaluation.

Knowledge

collect
describe
identify
list
show
tell
tabulate
define
examine
label
name
retell
state
quote
enumerate
match
read
record
reproduce
copy
select
Examples: dates, events, places, vocabulary, key ideas, parts of diagram, 5Ws

Comprehension

associate
compare
distinguish
extend
interpret
predict
differentiate
contrast
describe
discuss
estimate
group
summarize
order
cite
convert
explain
paraphrase
restate
trace

Examples: find meaning, transfer, interpret facts, infer cause & consequence, examples

Application

apply
classify
change
illustrate
solve
demonstrate
calculate
complete
solve
modify
show
experiment
relate
discover
act
administer
articulate
chart
collect
compute
construct
determine
develop
establish
prepare
produce
report
teach
transfer
use
Examples: use information in new situations, solve problems

Analysis

analyze
arrange
connect
divide
infer
separate
classify
compare
contrast
explain
select
order
breakdown
correlate
diagram
discriminate
focus
illustrate
infer
outline
prioritize
subdivide
points out
prioritize
Examples: recognize and explain patterns and meaning, see parts and wholes

Synthesis

combine
compose
generalize
modify
invent
plan
substitute
create
formulate
integrate
rearrange
design
speculate
rewrite
adapt
anticipate
collaborate
compile
devise
express
facilitate
reinforce
structure
substitute
intervene
negotiate
reorganize
validate
Examples: discuss "what if" situations, create new ideas, predict and draw conclusions

Evaluation

assess
compare
decide
discriminate
measure
rank
test
convince
conclude
explain
grade
judge
summarize
support
appraise
criticize
defend
persuade
justify
reframe

Examples: make recommendations, assess value and make choices, critique ideas

Affective Domain


Domain Attributes: interpersonal relations, emotions, attitudes, appreciations, and values
accepts
attempts
challenges
defends
disputes
joins
judges
contributes
id
praises
questions
shares
supports
volunteers